How to Re-season or Restore your Cast Iron

Spring is in full swing and summer is just around the corner. That means it’s time to pull out the old camping gear and get ready for a summer full of fun and adventure! For many, camping just isn’t camping without their favorite Dutch Oven recipes – rich, unique and delicious flavors. As you’re going through your gear getting ready for your next trip, you may find that your cast iron might not be in tip top shape, it may have even grown a little rust. Now worries there. Cast iron cookware can be relied on for a lifetime with the proper care, and bringing it back to a healthy state is always possible.

          

Cast Iron Genius, Gary House, has put together a video to walk you through how to restore your cast iron’s health back to perfection.

 


6 thoughts on “How to Re-season or Restore your Cast Iron”

    1. I think he does that portion of the restoration outside because it tends to smoke some as the seasoning bakes onto the cast

  1. I use my grandmother’s dutch which is about one hundred years old. It is a little sticky on the outside in one spot. Should I use it as is due to its age or should try to recondition it using the method demonstrated in your video? I found your video very informative and thoroughly enjoyable. Thank you for sharing your knowledge.
    Sarah Moss Starkey

    1. That’s awesome that you have your grandmother’s old Dutch oven! I don’t know how long the black seasoning on a Dutch oven will last. I know it is built up from oils and such that are baked into the pours of the cast iron. Personally, to err on the side of caution, I would reseason the thing if I were going to be cooking in it. Or you could just clean it up and keep it as a family heirloom.

  2. I just give my cast irons skillets and dutch ovens a wash and oil them and stick in the oven for a couple of hours until they stop smoking and some of the the cast irons that I have are back from the 1950’s I just do it on how my Grandma showed me how

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